Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Victorinox evolution : Can opener & Cap lifter

I've made a few mods by now and after my first few knives I started noticing the small evolution that Victorinox made with every tool. Some are the more known ones, like the 90 degree lock on the cap lifter and the pat. marking on the can opener, but I'm here to talk about the small, but ingenious steps we didn't even know they existed. Sometimes it isn't necessary to inform the user about these changes because they're so small, but in use they make a huge difference. Let's start with the Can opener... Victorinox used the 1,5mm gap (A) between cutter and spine for ages and ever since the late nineties (according to my knives) they changed to the 3mm gap (B). Why? Well I can only guess, but the only advantage you would get with this change is a stronger spine and small screwdriver. The other one I wanted to talk about is the base of the Cap lifter. This changed after the 90 degree lock (A - B) was introduced. Victorinox used a plain square base (B) in the first generation Cap lifter, but after a while they removed a small strip on the left side. Again a guess, ... this must've been done to save in material costs and weight but this doesn't affect the overall strength. One other change is the nail notch. They moved this a bit closer to the screwdriver. I've seen many of these changes, even with the Swisstool. They changed the plier head-setup to strengthen the tool when used to loosen locked nuts... Again ingenious... This shows that, even if the overall design didn't change for over a century, the tools change constantly to evolve in an indestructible toolbox...


2 comments:

  1. From what I understand, the notch in cap lifter C was put there to help keep it from closing when significant pressure was placed on a screw head with it fully open. The amount of material savings would eventually add up, over many millions of blades, but the cost reduction per knife would be minuscule. The weight savings is nil. The biggest issue with the blade has been its propensity to close up on a user pushing very hard with it.

    Wenger had the same issue and at some point redesigned theirs to push back into the knife slightly and lock when pressure is put on it. Springs back out afterward. Many Wenger users don't ever notice this. Victorinox has kept the Wenger cap lifter on the former Wenger knives carried over in 2013 into Victorinox's Delemont Evolution, EvoGrip and RangerGrip models; they're still made in the Wenger's former Delemont factory.

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  2. From what I understand, the notch in cap lifter C was put there to help keep it from closing when significant pressure was placed on a screw head with it fully open. The amount of material savings would eventually add up, over many millions of blades, but the cost reduction per knife would be minuscule. The weight savings is nil. The biggest issue with the blade has been its propensity to close up on a user pushing very hard with it.

    Wenger had the same issue and at some point redesigned theirs to push back into the knife slightly and lock when pressure is put on it. Springs back out afterward. Many Wenger users don't ever notice this. Victorinox has kept the Wenger cap lifter on the former Wenger knives carried over in 2013 into Victorinox's Delemont Evolution, EvoGrip and RangerGrip models; they're still made in the Wenger's former Delemont factory.

    ReplyDelete